Drop Cloth Upholstery

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Years ago, I inherited this chair from my parents.  They had it as long as I can remember. Initially, it belonged to my great grandmother, so it is easily close to 100 years old. The structure of the chair is remarkable and it’s my husband’s favorite place to sit and read. Over the years, my parents probably had it reupholstered 3 or 4 times. (When I was very little, I actually remember it being a lovely cream colored ‘pleather’…..oh my). The material that I covered over has been on the chair for well over a decade.

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This material/print is completely NOT my taste. I love the look of linen and french grain sack, but did not want to spend that kind of money on fabric. So, I decided that some drop cloths (washed well and dried) would fit the bill perfectly. I purchased 2 of these from Home Depot @ $11.98 a piece.

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And seriously, they wash up so lovely. I put them in with some bleach, detergent and fabric softener and then dried them well. So super soft and easy to work with. I began by piecing together the frame of the chair, minus the cushions.

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Then I began tucking, as deep as possible, down into the frame. The sides, back and arms were aligned and hot glued into place, as I was not sewing a slip cover for the body of the chair. Hot gluing is the way to go, plus I didn’t want to see staples all over the fabric and I was concerned about being able to reach the wood beneath the existing fabric. However, if you are a sewing wizard (I’m a basic skills gal with a sewing machine) then you may opt to quickly whip up a slip cover instead.

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I just folded the seems where I wanted and hot glued it into place, pulling taught and allowing it to cool and dry before letting go. This part moves along quickly. The blessing is, drop cloths have a stitched seam all around. So I strategically made sure to have those seams exposed at the base of the chair for a finished look.

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I then decided on the location of the folds/pleats at the front of the arms. Pinning them in place and then removing pins as I hot glued them in place.

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Cutting a small stip, I created a finished edge as I glued, folding the fabric under. Then finished off those seams with nail head trim….so super simple.

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This is when I broke out the sewing machine. I did sew a boat load of thick piping. I wanted the 2 cushions to be finished on both sides, that way I can flip them if necessary. So I traced around the cushions, sewed on the piping and hot glued the remaining seams together, since I was not going to insert a large zipper.

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Overall, this would be easy enough for any DIY’er. I suppose if you worked diligently, you could complete this in a couple of days. For me, with my kiddos sports activities, daily chores and other home improvement stuff going on, I sort of piece mealed this project to the end result….taking me just under a week.
My cost –
2 drop clothes = $ 24 (some left over)
Piping – $7 (lots left over)
Nail head trim $11 (lots left over)
Glue sticks $5 (tons left over)
Total = $47 + my free labor

Professional reupholstery would’ve run about $400. (I’ve had an estimate in the past). So my $47 cost has truly brought about outstanding satisfaction. Its such a clean and fresh update.

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Drop Cloth Love!

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Antique Chic Pie Safe Cupboard

I have been super side tracked lately with some of my projects. I’m sure many of you can relate. First, it was the crazy busy of Thanksgiving, with friends and family visiting. Then, I blinked and we were preparing for the hoopla of Christmas (and traveling away from home the week prior, returning just before Christmas eve). To the dreaded De-Christmasing right around New Years….and I’m still tired from it all.

Alas, I was finally able to get my hands on this cutie….which has been sitting in my workshop for 3 months…..so embarrassing. But totally true. I was excited when I came across this piece. It is an authentic Chittenden & Eastman Pie Safe/Cupboard. May date back to.the 1920’s. I actually saw one similar (highly restored) on Ebay for $1500. Rest assured, this piece is not quite that quality. You can tell it had been a little ‘too’ loved over the years….So I had to bring it back to life.

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While it definately need some sprucing up, I was delighted to see that it still had the side, tin, vented panels in tact (though they had been very sloppily painted silver) & the interior was painted a funky pale yellow. I quickly whipped up some DIY chalk paint and gave the entire interior 2 coats of a creamy white. The exterior need wood putty and sanding in areas but I knew I wanted to accent the cabinet door insets with the same creamy white, as well as, paint over the pre-painted tin panels.

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I decided that a neutral French Linen color would be nice on the exterior and help to cover up many of the aged and old repairs that must have been made decades ago. Its a wonderful, timeless color that really goes with anything.

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I tastefully distressed it and applied a nice coat of dark finishing paste wax for that perfect aged touch.

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It really turned out so fun and super functional as well. These types of pieces are very versitile too and not overly big. Wish I had a space to keep it. Now, this lovely needs a new home.