Wood Plank Farmhouse Hall Table

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I just finished up this cute little table for my wonderful sister in-law. This is the 3rd piece that I have recreated for her. (Praise God she has a little faith in me, such a bonus). She scored this fun table from a neighbor at a sweet price….FREE! Hello lovey!

Last year, I rehabbed this table for them (my awesome bro’ and sister in-law) to  use in their newly gutted and completely redone, outstanding kitchen.

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Isn’t it yummy? So stunning in their space. Well, they loved the end result on that jewel so much that they asked me to recreate their ‘free’ find with the same finish, so I did. And here’s where the little scalloped table began.

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A little rejected, abused and forgotten about. Her inner beauty was waiting to shine. Piles of cleaning or waxing residue and several stains adorned the top, so I stripped down to the bare wood. It was interesting to see the various grains, knots, worm holes and different planks that were used under the initial ‘orangey’ colored stain. All which added to the character.

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The table has great bones, a fun scalloped edge and it’s solid wood. I like to apply a sanding sealer to help the stain out a bit. Its clear and doesn’t need long to dry. After that, I applied 2 coats of Mixwax Jacobean stain. Allowing each coat to dry several hours in between. Then I used Minwax wipe on poly in satin. I did 2 coats and allowed each to dry several hours.

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Then it was onto the painting the body of the table. I gave it a good cleaning and a solid once over with some sand paper. Cleaned it again and applied 2 coats of DIY chalk paint in a creamy white (Polished Peal -Behr).

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The next day, I went over the edges lovingly with some sandpaper. I like distressing, but I usually feel like a little goes a long way. So I don’t go cra-cra with that process. I’m usually looking for that natural wear and tear look.

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After distressing, it received a good coat of dark wax (Minwax Finishing Paste in dark…..I order this on Amazon only because Home Depot doesn’t carry it.)

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You’re probably wondering where the hardware went? Let’s just say that it didn’t lend itself to the new and improved look of the table. So my sister in-law is purchasing new handles. (She’s brilliant). I LOVE the look of this table. So fun, charming and versatile.

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Thank you Ann, for allowing me to recreate another fun piece for you.

In The Navy……Hale Navy that is.

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Can you hear me singing hallelujah? I know I’m repeating myself, but I’m totally loving all things navy these days. I acquired this piece from a delightful woman who was down sizing and unloading of several pieces of funiture. I ended up grabbing the china cabinet as well,  (that transformation to come later), but it completely matches this buffet. So here is where it began.

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I adore serpentine, curvy front, pieces of furniture. So when I spotted this beauty, it was a no brainer. As mentioned, I knew I was going with DIY chalk paint using Hale Navy. Seriously, it’s so versatile and way more neutral than most might think.  Makes me love it that much more. After a good cleaning, the body received 2 coats of paint.

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The top had several scratches and I wanted it a bit deeper, so I sanded it down and gave it 2 coats of Jacobean and a good coat of polyurethane for protection.

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And then I let it sit for a day, drying and curing, but also deciding how I wanted to finish it. So, I typically have to walk away from a piece and return multiple times before deciding. I knew I was going to revive the hardware with gold Rub n’ Buff. Each of the drawers have a detailed trim, so I thought it would be fun to add a distressed gold to that trim. I literally rubbed the Rub n’ Buff on with my finger.

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After gently distressing the edges, I then used antiquing glaze and applied that all over the body of the piece, wiping it off right after applying. This added a great depth to the gorgeous navy. After that dried well, I applied a good coat of Minwax Finishing Paste Wax. Its my favorite.

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The hardware got a nice coat of gold Rub n’ Buff…..what a stellar transformation. And the end result…drum roll please…..

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So utterly gorgeous. I have it listed for sale, but am contemplating keeping it.

Vintage Music Cabinet

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Recently, I had the opportunity to revive this precious music cabinet for my sister in law. We had talked about doing this quite some time ago. She has had this piece for a very long time and it has received a lot of good use. This darling little gem was very tired though. The finish was very scratched and overall, well loved.

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After a good cleaning and sanding it was time for paint. My sister in law saw the secretary desk that I did in the ever so gorgeous, Hale Navy and decide that would be a good fit for this cute cabinet.

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And what a great choice. Its been given a whole new lease on life. 2 good coats of DIY chalk paint, lightly distressed and waxed well. The top received several coats of wipe on poly for added durability.

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We even added a new knob to finish off the quaint and charming new look.

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Stunning and fun new look. Thanks for allowing me to recreate your special piece Ann.

For the Love of Shiplap

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I have never been a fan of wood paneling on walls. I’m talking about Brady Bunch esq’, 1970’s, brown, thin, laminate type paneling???  No thank you. However, solid pine, tongue and groove, white, shiplap type paneling….makes my heart skip a beat.

If you’re  a lover of all things Fixer Upper with Chip and Joanna Gaines (like me), then you understand the type of Shiplap I am referring to. I’ve been dying to add some to the focal wall in our bedroom. So a few weeks ago, my awesome and handy hubby helped me to make that a reality.

We simulated the look of shiplap but did not use traditional shiplap. Rather, we purchased solid pine, tongue and groove boards from Home Depot that measured 6 inches wide by 8-10 feet long. And mainly because they gave the same effect at a reduced cost (approx $2.50 less per board than regular shiplap).

My husband is a step away from Bob Villa and has just about every tool we might need for any home improvement project big or small. What a guy.

SUPPLIES-
Measured amt. Of shiplap material
Measured amt. Of quarter round trim
Air compressor
Nail gun (w/long enough nails)
Tape measure
Chalk line tool
Stud finder
Caulk and spackle
Primer (Bulls Eye 123)
Paint (SW Alabaster white)

We began by locating the wall studs and marking them with a pencil. This way we know where to use the nail gun. You could go an extra step, as we have read, and use some liquid nails as well….but truly that seemed like over kill to us. Normally, you would begin this process from the floor up. We did it in reverse,  guess that’s just how we roll. But seriously, we did that because we found out by way of doing crown molding in our bedroom that our ceilings are not exactly level. So, knowing that the crown is absolutely level, we wanted to start where we knew things would look right. I’d rather have a small gap or an issue at the floor (preferably behind the bed) than up at the ceiling where I will stare at it constantly. Make sense?

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After we lined up the first boards, things moved along pretty smoothly. With each new row we measured the board, cut them to size and staggered the seams, sort of randomly really. (Have I mentioned how MUCH I love to use the nail gun? OMG…its addicting). We weren’t going for a specific pattern. And some of the wood has knots and imperfections which I feel just adds to the rustic charm.

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When we got to the bottom near the baseboards there was only a small gap on one side of the room. We knew this would be the case because of the issues that we had when we first hung our crown molding. I filled it in with extra caulk and no one will ever know except us. Then my husband measured and cut the quarter round trim pieces to add in the corners of the wall.

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Moving right along with all of your supplies on hand, one could probably finish the wall within a few hours. It took us a couple of days because my husband was leaving town on business. And then of course, I had to paint everything.

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This is how it look before priming and painting. It’s lovely if you’re going for that blue Pine, very rustic look. I knew from the beginning I wanted mine White. And I love the end result.

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Now, I’d like a new bed frame. I’ve been on the hunt for something a little less ornate and probably upholstered. We shall see. Until then, I’m loving the wall and I’d like to do a few more walls in the house.

Oh Hale Yeah…..

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It’s been busy around here, working on other projects, as well as some custom pieces for clients. Then we had a bit of travel over our kiddos spring break. Visited the lovely and warm area of Phoenix and then onto Lake Las Vegas, before traveling home in an absolute blizzard. Suffice it to say…..I MISS MY FLIP FLOPS!!!!!

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So I was finally able to get my hands on the cutie that had been sitting in my workshop for some time. Fun, little Chippendale style secretary desk that I transformed. Looking very smart in her Hale Navy dress blues with a touch of Parisian Grey on the interior.

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The cubby area was restained with Jacobean and is completely removable, very cool. Replaced all the hardware and decided to go with some antique bronze, card catalog pulls with labels on the drawers….for the ultimate desk type organization. The cabinet doors above received matching colored knobs with some small decorative details.

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Another fun addition….this piece came with the original and fully functioning skeleton key. So sweet!

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I’m digging all things navy these days and this piece does not disappoint. She just needs a new home now.