Antique Farmhouse Cupboard

Crazy story, really. While on the hunt for a piece of furniture to rehab, I came across this lovely lady. She definately needed some work, but I was up for the challenge (and I can usually talk handy hubby into breaking out the power tools). The gal we bought this from acquired it from an antiques dealer in Upstate New York. She was moving to Hawaii and literally depleting all of her belongings that would not fit into her compact car, which was being shipped on a boat for her.  When we went to go look at it, it was in several pieces. And only because the top separates from the base and all of the doors have old school/primitive ‘lift off’ hinges. Coolest thing ever.

  
Given the size of the piece and the nature of the work needed, I could see where others would shy away.  The sweet gals mother was encouraging her to break it down into wood pieces and scrap it (I about lost my breath). She said she would rather burn it in the back yard than put it in the garbage, as she spent a small fortune on it initially. At this stage, her house was sold and she was leaving the country 48 hrs later. Enter stage left, my hubby and I there to take a peak. After looking and chatting a bit, thinking we might be able to make things work, the nice gal literally shares her story (about her mom and then saying she’d rather burn it), so she makes us an offer that we could not refuse.  It was an easy decision, so we loaded it all up, in 2 vehicles, and brought our baby home. Ahhhhh, I was so excited.  The details on this piece are fantastic. And, true to its almost primitive age, the small scale chicken wire on the upper cabinet doors is literally sandwiched in between the pieces of wood that make up each door. Very cool…..I’ve never seen that before. I couldn’t wait to get busy.

If you look closely, the upper cabinet area had a huge hole cut out of it.  Before it came to us, it was being used an entertainment area. The cutout was for a television. Handy hubby to the rescue here. After digging through some scrap wood, my husband was able to piece together a replacement for the cutout area. And he totally mimicked the board and batten type design inside. He also cut new wood for the shelving, as the old shelves were terribly warped. After cleaning, lightly sanding and cleaning again, it was time to paint. The exterior received 2 coats of DIY chalk paint in Alabaster White and the upper interior area was painted in a grey/blue called Winterwood by Benjamin Moore. Some light distressing and a solid coat of dark wax was applied to the exterior. The interior shelves all received 2 coats of wipe on Poly for durability.  The end result is truly lovely. 

   
 
The huge hole is gone and she can resume life as a wonderful antique, farmhouse cupboard.  In a large kitchen, dining room, it could hold linens and quilts or I could totally see this in a quaint store front (hmmmmm, if only I had a store). 

   
   

   
   
Just waiting for her new home. I hope somebody falls in love with this like I did.

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Antique Chic Pie Safe Cupboard

I have been super side tracked lately with some of my projects. I’m sure many of you can relate. First, it was the crazy busy of Thanksgiving, with friends and family visiting. Then, I blinked and we were preparing for the hoopla of Christmas (and traveling away from home the week prior, returning just before Christmas eve). To the dreaded De-Christmasing right around New Years….and I’m still tired from it all.

Alas, I was finally able to get my hands on this cutie….which has been sitting in my workshop for 3 months…..so embarrassing. But totally true. I was excited when I came across this piece. It is an authentic Chittenden & Eastman Pie Safe/Cupboard. May date back to.the 1920’s. I actually saw one similar (highly restored) on Ebay for $1500. Rest assured, this piece is not quite that quality. You can tell it had been a little ‘too’ loved over the years….So I had to bring it back to life.

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While it definately need some sprucing up, I was delighted to see that it still had the side, tin, vented panels in tact (though they had been very sloppily painted silver) & the interior was painted a funky pale yellow. I quickly whipped up some DIY chalk paint and gave the entire interior 2 coats of a creamy white. The exterior need wood putty and sanding in areas but I knew I wanted to accent the cabinet door insets with the same creamy white, as well as, paint over the pre-painted tin panels.

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I decided that a neutral French Linen color would be nice on the exterior and help to cover up many of the aged and old repairs that must have been made decades ago. Its a wonderful, timeless color that really goes with anything.

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I tastefully distressed it and applied a nice coat of dark finishing paste wax for that perfect aged touch.

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It really turned out so fun and super functional as well. These types of pieces are very versitile too and not overly big. Wish I had a space to keep it. Now, this lovely needs a new home.